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Spring 2006

 

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Physics (PHYS)
120 Willamette, 346-4751
College of Arts & Sciences
Course Data
  PHYS 153   Phys of Light & Color >3 4.00 cr.
Light and color, their nature, how they are produced, and how they are perceived and interpreted.
Grading Options: Optional; see degree guide or catalog for degree requirements
Instructor: Taylor RE-mailHomepage Office:   173 Willamette Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4741
Office Hours: 1200 - 1300 MWF  
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  36984 0 72 1400-1550 tr 110 WIL Taylor R  

Final Exam:

1300-1500 t 6/13 110 WIL
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
April 2:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 9:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 9:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded)
April 10:   Drop this course (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 10:   Process a complete drop (75% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 12:   Add this course
April 12:   Last day to change to or from audit
April 16:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
April 23:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
April 30:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
May 21:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
May 21:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
Light and color have a dramatic impact on our daily experiences. This course will explore the physics of light and explain how its basic properties produce a diverse range of effects apparent in technology, nature and art. The course is concept driven, highly visual and requires a minimum of mathematics (high school algebra).

Undergraduates who take this course are typically drawn from a diverse range of backgrounds (e.g. psychology, art history, art, photography, architecture, journalism) and inter-disciplinary discussions are encouraged. Where appropriate, guest lecturers will discuss recent advances/concepts in their subject, both emphasizing the variety offered by inter-disciplinary activities and also the direct relevance of light and color to our daily lives.

Students will first be introduced to the fundamental concepts of light and shown how light belongs to a broader range of radiation known as the electromagnetic spectrum. This spectrum spans through gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, light, infra-red radiation, microwaves and radio waves. The manner in which these various forms of radiation interact with the world will be compared and contrasted.

Drawing heavily on practical demonstrations, various optical devices will be described, leading to a detailed examination of cameras and photography. This is followed by a comparison with nature's equivalent of the camera - the human eye. This includes both an examination of how an image is produced by the eye?s optical system and also how the resulting image is then processed by the retina and brain, including examples of optical illusions. Finally, the various color theories will be introduced, explained and demonstrated.

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