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Spring 2019

 

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Psychology (PSY)
139 Straub Hall, 541-346-4921
College of Arts & Sciences
G - Pre-major, major, or minor are required to take this course graded to be applied to major/minor requirements
Course Data
  PSY 201   Mind and Brain >3 4.00 cr.
Introduction to perception, memory, learning, and cognition.
Grading Options: Optional; see degree guide or catalog for degree requirements
Instructor: Bala JE-mail Office:   225 Straub Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4953
Office Hours: 1000 - 1130 T Reserved for drop-in advising
  1030 - 1200 W Reserved for drop-in advising
See CRN for CommentsPrereqs/Comments: C or higher for PSY majors
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  35004 6 510 1200-1350 mw 156 STB Bala J !G

Final Exam:

1015-1215 m 6/10 156 STB
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
March 31:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
April 6:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 6:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
April 7:   Add this course
April 7:   Process a complete withdrawal (90% refund, W recorded)
April 7:   Withdraw from this course (100% refund, W recorded)
April 10:   Last day to change to or from audit
April 14:   Process a complete withdrawal (75% refund, W recorded)
April 14:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
April 21:   Process a complete withdrawal (50% refund, W recorded)
April 21:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
April 28:   Process a complete withdrawal (25% refund, W recorded)
April 28:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
May 19:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
May 19:   Change grading option for this course
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and behavior. Our ability to think, feel, and act emerges from the interrelated activity of neural networks in our brain. Thus, a full understanding on how the mind works requires close consideration of its biological foundations. Psychologists rely on empirical means - systematic observation and experimentation - to learn about how the human brain enables basic cognitive processes such as learning, memory and attention. This course, combined with its companion, Psychology 202, provides a broad introduction to the key areas of psychology.

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to basic concepts about core mental functions such as learning, memory and attention, and how the brain enables these functions. Across a variety of domains, this course examines the core principles that govern how our mind functions, as well as how these principles arise from the underlying neural substrate.

Some of the topics covered in this course are:

.Brain basics: How does experience and thought emerge from interacting neurons? How can we find out what different areas in the brain do? How do these areas work together to produce goal-directed action?

.Perception: How is it that our brain/mind can construct from physical properties (e.g., wave length in case of vision) the rich and meaningful content of our conscious awareness?

.Learning: Humans, along with many animals, are immensely flexible, due to the ability to learn about changing environmental regularities. What are the basic laws of learning that underlie this flexibility?

.Memory: Without our mind's ability to travel back in time to past events, there would be no planful consideration of the future, no sense of self. However, what exactly is a memory and how are memories represented in the brain?

An important goal is to convey a solid understanding of the experimental and neuroscience approach to understanding the mind. To this end, the course incorporates classroom demonstrations of critical experimental methods and frequently features examples from recently published empirical studies.

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Release: 8.9.1