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Fall 2021

 

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Mathematics (MATH)
202 Fenton, 541-346-4705
College of Arts & Sciences
M - Major, minor, pre-major, or concentration restrictions. If restricted by date, click on CRN to see effective dates; courses with no date are restricted through the registration deadline. Contact the academic department for additional information.
Course Data
  MATH 205   Foundations Math Lab 2.00 cr.
Exploratory course in mathematics. Course focuses on techniques of mathematical exploration and discovery, the language of mathematics, and foundational issues. Topics from the foundations of mathematics.
Grading Options: Pass/No Pass Only for all students
Instructor: Addington NE-mailHomepage Office:   208 Fenton Hall
Phone:   (541) 346-4716
Office Hours: 1000 - 1200 W  
Only Open to Majors: Mathematics
 
  CRN Avail Max Time Day Location Instructor Notes
  13886 8 25 1400-1450 mw 106 FR Addington N M
Academic Deadlines
Deadline     Last day to:
September 26:   Process a complete drop (100% refund, no W recorded)
October 2:   Drop this course (100% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 2:   Process a complete drop (90% refund, no W recorded; after this date, W's are recorded)
October 3:   Process a complete withdrawal (90% refund, W recorded)
October 3:   Withdraw from this course (100% refund, W recorded)
October 4:   Add this course
October 6:   Last day to change to or from audit
October 10:   Process a complete withdrawal (75% refund, W recorded)
October 10:   Withdraw from this course (75% refund, W recorded)
October 17:   Process a complete withdrawal (50% refund, W recorded)
October 17:   Withdraw from this course (50% refund, W recorded)
October 24:   Process a complete withdrawal (25% refund, W recorded)
October 24:   Withdraw from this course (25% refund, W recorded)
November 14:   Withdraw from this course (0% refund, W recorded)
Caution You can't drop your last class using the "Add/Drop" menu in DuckWeb. Go to the “Completely Withdraw from Term/University” link to begin the complete withdrawal process. If you need assistance with a complete drop or a complete withdrawal, please contact the Office of Academic Advising, 101 Oregon Hall, 541-346-3211 (8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday). If you are attempting to completely withdraw after business hours, and have difficulty, please contact the Office of Academic Advising the next business day.

Expanded Course Description
Reading a book like “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” is fairly straightforward: each sentence conveys a direct idea on what a character did, said, or thought, and these ideas fit together easily to make a simple story. Reading a play by Shakespeare is quite different: sentences can convey multiple ideas at once, characters can say one thing and mean another, and the stories have layers upon layers of meaning. Reading Shakespeare takes training and practice. Reading mathematics, and learning mathematics, is a lot like reading Shakespeare. One doesn’t just sit down and read each sentence, and have the ideas fit together easily. One has to find the deeper meaning in the sentences, and carefully put together the story that they are trying to tell. This is difficult, and sometimes frustrating, but learning to do it opens up a wonderful and exciting world. In this course we will read some mathematics together. We will talk about ways to make sense of what you read, and we will do a lot of exploring. Some of the skills we will focus on are: trying examples, looking for patterns, making conjectures, testing conjectures, and modifying conjectures. These might sound easy, but when you are reading mathematics you need to be constantly doing all five of these things! It takes practice. A “set” is the mathematical term for a collection of objects—picture a bag with a bunch of objects in it. It seems to be a very simple concept, but in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries people realized that you can build up almost all of mathematics by just starting with the theory of sets. People thinking about infinite sets also came up with some very, very strange realizations that were quite shocking—and will shock you, too, when you learn about them. You can take a tennis ball, cut it up into little pieces, and put it back together so that it is as big as the moon! Do you believe it? This is the Banach-Tarski paradox, which we will learn about. Originally, people hoped that one could build all of mathematics from the theory of sets. This looked possible for a while, until Godel stunned everyone by proving that this is not possible. In fact, he proved that it is not possible to reduce all of mathematics to a finite set of basic ideas. This is his famous Incompleteness Theorem, which we will end the course with.
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